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Top-caliber imports for Beermen, Katropa

first_imgRead Next The two teams bared their respective import choices for the season-ending conference, with the KaTropa signing up Terrence Jones’ former teammate at Houston, KJ McDaniels, in an effort to end a four-year title drought.Wells is an American who has had stops in the NBAG-League and pro leagues in Italy and Greece after playing out a stellar collegiate career with the Maryland Terapins.AdChoices广告Ads by TeadsFEATURED STORIESSPORTSAllen Durham chews out Meralco: Everybody played like sh*tSPORTSGolden State Warriors sign Lee to multiyear contract, bring back ChrissSPORTSThirdy Ravena gets‍‍‍ offers from Asia, Australian ball clubsThis will be the Beermen’s second shot at a Triple Crown sweep in three years after coming up short in 2017 with Renaldo Balkman.McDaniels will come to a TNT team that is still licking its wounds after losing in six games to San Miguel. And he has one item in his credentials that active consultant Mark Dickel loves so much. San Miguel Beer is leaving nothing to chance in its bid to complete the second PBA Grand Slam for the franchise, tapping seasoned Dez Wells for the Governors’ Cup tentatively set to open on Sept. 20.After returning to the top of the list of contenders with a strong runner-up finish to the Beermen in the Commissioner’s Cup, TNT, meanwhile, is pinning its hopes on another Houston Rocket and hopefully deny San Miguel its date with history.ADVERTISEMENT MOST READ LATEST STORIES View comments ONE: Gina Iniong eager to showcase her best in 1st fight of 2020 OSG petition a ‘clear sign’ of gov’t bid to block ABS-CBN franchise renewal — solon Robredo hits Mocha over false post: Why let gov’t pay a fake news purveyor? Roger Federer: Rafael Nadal, Novak Djokovic ‘will win more’ Lacson on Albayalde, ‘ninja cops’ indictment: The law has a ‘very long memory’ “I expect defense from him,” Dickel said of McDaniels, the Atlantic Coast Conference’s Defensive Player of the Year in 2014. “He’s a complete player.”Jones came up just short in leading the KaTropa back to the winner’s circle, and it was just a coincidence, Dickel said, that the team picked Jones’ former Houston teammate as an import for the third conference.The two imports are set to banner their respective teams when San Miguel and TNT rekindle their rivalry at the Asia League’s Terrific 12 tournament at Tap Seac Multisports Pavilion in Macau, China, beginning Sept. 17.ADVERTISEMENT BREAKING: DOJ indicts ex-PNP chief Albayalde for graft Coco Gauff vs. Venus Williams in 1st round of Australian Open WATCH: Robredo repacks relief goods with ‘mocha’ behind her Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. 3rd SMB grand slam bid uplast_img read more

Tobacco control

first_imgYesterday (Friday, 31 May) was observed across the world as World No Tobacco Day, and several countries took the opportunity once again to highlight the dangers of tobacco use, and what could be done by Governments and health partners to minimise the impact of tobacco use on communities.According to the World Health Organisation (WHO), tobacco is responsible for around 7 million deaths per year worldwide. This includes 900,000 persons who die from diseases related to exposure to tobacco smoke. If current trends continue, tobacco use would kill 10 million people per year by 2020. Seventy per cent of these fatalities would occur in less developed and emerging nations. WHO has also explained that over 40 per cent of all tobacco-related deaths are from lung diseases like cancer, chronic respiratory diseases, and tuberculosis.Here, in Guyana, 78 per cent of all deaths are caused by non-communicable diseases (NCDs), some of which we all know are strongly related to tobacco use. Over 15 per cent of the adult population currently smoke; and, more worryingly, the results of a Global Youth Tobacco Survey conducted in 2015 revealed that 14.8 per cent of adolescents aged between 13 and 15 years also use tobacco.Countries, including Guyana, must take stock of what is happening, and continue to work diligently with international health partners to increase action to protect people from exposure to tobacco use. Too many people are dying senselessly, and urgent action must be taken, as these are deaths which can be avoided.The WHO’s Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (FCTC) is an international public health treaty and a guiding framework for the global fight against the tobacco epidemic. Guyana has been a party to the FCTC since 2005. The FCTC requires countries to apply a series of policies and measures aimed at reducing the global tobacco epidemic.After a lengthy process, perhaps many months of consultations, in July 2017 Guyana took the bold step of passing the National Tobacco Act. This legislation follows several of the Articles of the WHO Convention, and mandates the adoption and implementation of a series of tobacco control policies that make it one of the most complete tobacco control laws. These include: 100 per cent smoke-free environments in all indoor public spaces, indoor work spaces, public transportation and specified outdoor spaces, to protect people from exposure to tobacco smoke; a ban on all forms of advertising, promotion and sponsorship of tobacco products; health warnings featured on 60 per cent of tobacco product packaging, including images. It also includes a ban on the sale of tobacco products to and by minors; prohibition on vending machines’ sales; and a ban on the manufacture and sales of toys and candies and any other goods in the form of tobacco products.However, having the necessary legislation in place is a good starting point, but there are many other challenges which health authorities must address if Guyana is to really reduce the number of persons dying or becoming ill due to tobacco use or exposure. These challenges relate to monitoring and compliance, and enforcement of the legislation to ensure that the population is protected from the dangers of tobacco use. Much of the success will be based on the quality of enforcement mechanisms in place. Aspects of enforcement are crucial, without which a legislation will face implementation challenges.That said, ensuring the protection of a country’s population is not a very easy process, but many would say the payoff in the end could be very huge, as it results directly in the improved health and wellbeing of citizens. On this basis, the WHO is urging countries to fight the tobacco epidemic through full implementation of the WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (WHO FCTC) and enforcing effective tobacco control actions; for example, by reducing demand for tobacco through taxation and creating smoke-free places etc.Parents and community and religious leaders are also being urged to take steps to safeguard the health of their families and communities by informing them of, and protecting them from, the harms caused by tobacco.There is also need for continuous public awareness and education campaigns about the harmful effects of tobacco use and exposure.last_img read more

Police prosecutors better equipped to handle TIP cases

first_imgProsecutors of the Guyana Police Force are now better equipped with the necessary skills to successfully present a Trafficking In Person (TIP) case in court, following a training course by the Ministerial Task Force on Trafficking In Persons.The training will also enable prosecutors to use evidence effectively to prove perpetrators guilty, the Government Information Agency (GINA) reported. The training course was held at the Guyana Police Force Officers’ Training Centre and is in line with the combating of Trafficking In Persons Act No. 2 of 2005, while taking international best practices into consideration.Police prosecutors of the GPF along with facilitators of the one-day TIP training programmeThe prosecutors received training in identification, prevention and prosecution as it relates to TIP. They also highlighted some of the challenges they faced when prosecuting a TIP case and shared several success stories.Task Force Coordinator (ag) from the Public Security Ministry, Oliver Profit, said that the Task Force is aware of the challenges that Prosecutors face when building and prosecuting TIP cases.However, he noted that these challenges can be solved with team work among the different agencies. Profit added that Task Force will also be assessing the needs of Police Prosecutors with regard to similar cases locally.Additionally, the Task Force will be creating a network with prosecutors whereby they can review successes, failures and make recommendations to improve future TIP cases.Presentations to the prosecutors highlighted definition, the act and means of Trafficking In Persons. Additionally, Profit outlined the four key areas that the Task Force is functioning by. These include prevention, protection, prosecution and partnerships.Additionally, Probation and Social Services Officer from the Social Protection Ministry Counter-Trafficking In Persons (C-TIP) Denise Ralph said the Ministry has been working tirelessly to assist victims of TIP. She noted a number of victims, who are in the Ministry’s care, are enrolled in number of courses. These include cosmetology, home management among other areas.Trafficking In Persons mean the recruitment, transportation, transfer, harbouring or receipt of persons, by means of the threat or use by force or other forms of coercion, of abduction, of fraud, of deception, of the abuse of power or of a position of vulnerability or of the giving and receiving of payments or benefits to achieve the consent of a person having control over another person, for the purpose of exploitation. Exploitation shall include, at a minimum, the exploitation of the prostitution of others or other forms of sexual exploitation, forced labour or services, slavery or practices similar to slavery, servitude or the removal of organ.A number of Ministries, non-government organisations (NGOs) and other stakeholders will be working together to combat TIP. Several awareness campaigns, which will target schools, are planned throughout the year to sensitise youths on human trafficking.The Social Protection Ministry’s Counter-Trafficking in Persons (C-TIP) The C-TIP unit is also planning a local documentary on human trafficking. This is aimed at eradicating the myth that trafficking only entails sex workers. The possibility of conducting street theatres is also explored.The unit intends to develop and pilot test a TIP module that is to be implemented in primary and secondary schools by the end of next year.The unit will continue to work with its partners including the Guyana Police Force, the Guyana Geology and Mines Commission, and the Guyana Women Miners Organisation to conduct outreaches in the various regions.last_img read more

OUT & ABOUT: PICTURE SPECIAL AS JLS WOO CROWDS AT THE PULSE

first_img     OUT & ABOUT: PICTURE SPECIAL AS JLS WOO CROWDS AT THE PULSE was last modified: April 9th, 2012 by BrendaShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:donegalJLSJLS FANSLETTERKENNY NIGHTCLUBOUT & ABOUT: PICTURE SPECIAL AS JLS WOO CROWDS AT THE PULSE CHART-topping JLS certainly wooed the crowds during their appearance at The Pulse nightclub in Letterkenny at the weekend.Hundreds turned up to see the stars – and weren’t disappointed.All pictures courtesy of The Pulse, Letterkenny. last_img read more

Football gossip and latest transfer rumours – Monday, November 20

first_imgHere are the top headlines and transfer-related stories in Monday’s newspapers and online…Paris Saint-Germain captain Thiago Silva has revealed he is in regular contact with Liverpool playmaker Philippe Coutinho and hopes his fellow Brazilian will “work with us”. (Telefoot)?Manchester City will compete with Liverpool for Southampton defender Virgil van Dijk in the January transfer window. (Daily Mirror)Tottenham are preparing to receive a £40million bid from Manchester United for left-back Danny Rose in January. Speculation over Rose’s future was reignited this weekend after he was dropped from the squad to face Arsenal. (Daily Mirror)It is claimed Red Devils defender Luke Shaw could be heading to Spurs as part of the deal for England international Rose. (Daily Mirror)Meanwhile, Tottenham star Harry Kane is fully committed to the north London club, with reports claiming he wants to spend his “entire career” at Spurs despite potential interest from clubs including Real Madrid and Barcelona. (Evening Standard)Liverpool striker Daniel Sturridge could be on his way out of Anfield on loan as he hopes to get more regular first-team football ahead of the World Cup. (Daily Mirror)The Reds could be set to sign Sheffield United and Wales starlet David Brooks, 20, after he made his full international debut last week. Tottenham are also interested. (Daily Express)Manchester City could make a move to sign Leicester City playmaker Riyad Mahrez in January. Mahrez had been linked with a move to Barcelona, but it is claimed Barca star Lionel Messi has objected to the Algerian moving to the Nou Camp. (Don Balon)City are also looking bring in 22-year-old Schalke midfielder Leon Goretzka, who is out of contract at the end of the season and has also caught the attention of Arsenal, Liverpool and Chelsea. (Daily Mirror)Crystal Palace full-back Patrick van Aanholt is also on the radar of the Premier League leaders as they eye cover for the injured Benjamin Mendy. (The Sun)Bournemouth are eyeing up Reading left-back Omar Richards. The 19-year-old has only just broken into the first team for the Royals but Eddie Howe is looking to take the youngster on in the January transfer window. (The Sun)last_img read more

Open-Source Projects Need More Than Good Code—They Need Marketing

first_imgMost open source developers focus on writing great code and don’t bother marketing their project. Which is why most open-source projects fail. Utterly.While it’s a convenient fiction to believe that open source is a meritocracy where the best code wins, it’s just that: fiction. As Apache Storm founder Nathan Marz writes in a recent blog post, solving an important project with useful code is only half the battle. It’s equally important—and sometimes more so—”to convince a significant number of people that your project is the best solution to their problem.”See also: How To Get Started In Open SourceThat’s called marketing, and most developers are terrible at it.Telling StoriesI’ve written before that every technology company needs at least one English major. It’s easy to believe that the world will beat a path to your project’s door, Field of Dreams style (“If you build it, they will come”). But the world doesn’t work that way.People—and developers are people, too—have a finite amount of attention. That’s why we’re seeing the fading of the polyglot programmer. As former Googler Tim Bray notes, “There is a re­al cost to this con­tin­u­ous widen­ing of the base of knowl­edge a de­vel­op­er has to have to re­main rel­e­van­t.”  See also: Why Every Tech Company Needs An English MajorAs the number of open source projects booms, getting developers interested in your particular project is non-trivial. By marketing a project well, developers can cut through the noise and help their project to stand out. As former Facebook and Google engineering executive Santosh Jayaram articulates, English majors are critical for helping companies “tell stories” about their projects. And while no developer really wants to read some Randomly capitalized Blurb on GitHub about a Project!, as the worst marketing “professionals” are prone to do, project leads who can tell a compelling story around their project, English-major style, are more likely to find developers that want to use and/or contribute to a project.The Accidental Marketing Of StormThis is what Nathan Marz discovered as he sought to increase adoption of Storm, a real-time computation system. In 2011, I joined Dave Rosenberg to build a company (Nodeable) focused on delivering Storm as a service. The company was a bit ahead of its time and ended up getting acquired by Appcelerator.Storm, on the other hand, really took off. Twitter started acquisition talks with Marz in May 2011 to acquire his company, Backtype. To help increase the valuation Marz wrote this blog post, touting the potential of Storm, which was at the heart of Backtype’s technology stack. In the process he stumbled on the value of marketing the project:The post had some surprising other effects. In the post I casually referred to Storm as “the Hadoop of realtime,” and this phrase really caught on. To this day people still use it, and it even gets butchered into “realtime Hadoop” by many people. This accidental branding was really powerful and helped with adoption later on.From then on, Marz spent a great deal of time both developing the technology and (in his words) hyping it, bolstering that marketing hype with documentation because “people cannot use your software if they don’t understand it.” But it wasn’t just code. Marz also hit the campaign trail, blitzing conferences:Over the next year I did a ton of talks on Storm at conferences, meetups, and companies. I believe I did over 25 Storm talks. It got to a point where I could present Storm with my eyes closed. All this speaking got Storm more and more exposure.The result, however, was worth it:The marketing paid off and Storm acquired production users very quickly. I did a survey in January of 2012 and found out Storm had 10 production users, another 15 planning to have it in production soon, and another 30 companies experimenting with the technology. To have that many production users for a major piece of infrastructure in only 3 months since release was very significant.Get Yourself A Story TellerStorm has become an incredibly important project, but it never would have reached this stage without a lot of marketing along the way. As should be clear by now, I’m not talking about billboards along Highway 101 or pop-up ads on Hacker News (if those existed). Rather, I’m suggesting highly informative marketing like Marz did to raise awareness of and interest in Storm:Building a successful project requires a lot more than just producing good code that solves an important problem. Documentation, marketing, and community development are just as important. Especially in the early days, you have to be creative and think of clever ways to get the project established. Examples of how I did that were making use of the Twitter brand, starting the mailing list a few months before release, and doing a big hyped up release to maximize exposure. Additionally, there’s a lot of tedious, time-consuming work involved in building a successful project, such as writing docs, answering the never-ending questions on the mailing list, and giving talks.This isn’t the sexy work of a code jockey. But it’s this very marketing drudgery that often will make the difference between a great project that no one uses and a great project that changes the world. Linux, for example, didn’t hit its stride in the enterprise until IBM committed to spend $1 billion marketing and promoting it. Storm, for its part, didn’t require a $1 billion injection. But it did require a heck of a lot of Marz’s time spent marketing, not coding.Lead image courtesy of Shutterstock Matt Asay Related Posts How to Write a Welcome Email to New Employees? Growing Phone Scams: 5 Tips To Avoidcenter_img Why You Love Online Quizzes Tags:#Apache Storm#developers#marketing#Nathan Marz#Open Source#Santosh Jayaram#Storytelling#Tim Bray 7 Types of Video that will Make a Massive Impac…last_img read more

Lots of scientists marched yesterday. Five explain why they didn’t

first_imgHank Ratrie’s creaky knees kept him from the Washington, D.C., march, but he was planning to take his students caving. Lots of scientists marched yesterday. Five explain why they didn’t Saturday’s march coverage focused, naturally enough, on those who turned out in the streets. But Science’s Dorie Chevlen spent some time talking with those who didn’t march, for one reason or another.Turns out not marching can be a sensitive topic: When Dorie posted a note looking for nonmarchers on a march-related website, several commenters called for her post to be removed, accused her of being a troll, and even suggested she was a Russian operative trying to wreak havoc. Even simple questioning about the march, it appears, can to some people feel like an assault on science itself.Here’s what some nonmarchers told Dorie:Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)Hank Ratrie, a biology professor at Goucher College in Baltimore, Maryland, agreed with the march’s aims, but trekking to D.C. to walk around the Mall for several hours wasn’t easy at his age. “I’m getting old,” the 71-year-old Ratrie explains, “and I’m not a big fan of crowds, either.” So he was planning “to make my science gesture by taking my students caving instead” – giving them some first-hand exposure to field observation. Anahita Hamidi, neuroscience Ph.D. candidate at University of California, Davis, was inclined to support the march. But as a minority—queer, Iranian-American, a female researcher—she wasn’t happy about how its U.S. organizers handled diversity issues. “I’m not sitting on the outside policing every statement … but a lot of the people in the leadership positions who were part of the organizing and part of the diversity committees stepped down. And I think that was a big red flag for me.” If the march had been the only opportunity to stand up for science, she says, she’d have been there, but “I don’t see that this is the end-all, be-all. I don’t think that this is my only opportunity to be an activist for science.” By Dorie ChevlenApr. 23, 2017 , 11:30 AM Nick McMurray, entomology undergraduate at University of California, Davis, and small business owner in Nevada City, California, was concerned about the possible fallout from the march. “It’s good to see people getting involved and passionate,” he says, but “I’m afraid that it’s going to be perceived as just another liberal-democrat progressive’s complaining-fest. … And I don’t think that any of the people who we need to be reaching about science are going to listen.” Rather than organize a march, McMurray believes that “we need to better articulate [the importance of sound science policy and funding] to people—because some people don’t have a good education, some people may need more time, but we’re all intelligent people on some level.” Jenn Danzig Tracey Mueller-Gibbs, conservation biologist and advocate based in San Diego, California, had been on the fence, but in the end she didn’t march. The event would have benefited from “look[ing] beyond the partisan ideals,” she says, and instead asking “what did we do as members of this society to allow the problems that exist to get here?” And she urged marchers to take on the “everyday practice of looking at what we are doing as scientists, as well as individuals outside the scientific community, to question what are we doing—let’s be aware, let’s speak up, let’s see the smaller problems rather than allowing them to become grand problems.” Hank Ratrie Virginia Schutte Anahita Hamidi Anahita Hamidi Nick McMurray Tracey Mueller-Gibbs Virginia Schutte, science communicator in Houma, Louisiana, didn’t think a march is the best way to encourage support for science. “It seems like the way the event has been set up and branded, it’s not going to reach outside of the people who are already aligned with the cause. It won’t be able to change any minds.” She’s thought long about that challenge (and even penned a 5-step strategy online) and thinks ultimately the way to communicate the march’s cause will be through one-on-one conversations: “Many people shy away from topics that they know are hot-button … but letting people see that people they already like have different views from them, that is what will bring about real change in the long run.” Virginia Schutte Nick McMurray last_img read more

Top stories: Chocolate money, the rise of multicellularity, and pet rabbit brains

first_img(left to right): ARINA HABICH/ALAMY STOCK PHOTO; WANG CHI LAU/ EMBRYOLOGY COURSE AT THE MARINE BIOLOGICAL LABORATORY; istock.com/martinedoucet The Maya civilization used chocolate as moneyYour Hershey bar may have been worth its weight in gold in Mayan times. A new study reveals that chocolate became its own form of money at the height of Mayan opulence—and that the loss of this delicacy may have played a role in the downfall of the famed civilization.The momentous transition to multicellular life may not have been so hard after allSign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)Billions of years ago, life crossed a threshold. Single cells started to band together, and a world of formless, unicellular life was on course to evolve into the riot of shapes and functions of multicellular life today, from ants to pear trees to people. It’s a transition as momentous as any in the history of life, and until recently we had no idea how it happened.Why your pet rabbit is more docile than its wild relativeWhy does a wild rabbit flee when a person approaches, but a domestic rabbit sticks around for a treat? A new study finds that domestication may have triggered changes in the brains of these—and perhaps other—animals that have helped them adapt to their new, human-dominated environment.U.S. judge tosses climate lawsuits by California cities, but says science is soundA federal judge this week threw out lawsuits from two California cities seeking to make oil companies pay for worsening sea-level rise and other climate change impacts. San Francisco and Oakland, California, sued Chevron Corp., BP PLC, ConocoPhillips, Exxon Mobil Corp., and Royal Dutch Shell PLC, arguing the companies make and sell products that, when combusted, create a public nuisance. The cities also contended that the companies knew the global dangers for decades and hid that information while protecting their assets.Hundreds of new genes may underlie intelligence—but also autism and depressionBeing smart is a double-edged sword. Intelligent people appear to live longer, but many of the genes behind brilliance can also lead to autism, anxiety, and depression, according to two new massive genetic studies. The work is also one of the first to identify the specific cell types and genetic pathways tied to intelligence and mental health, potentially paving the way for new ways to improve education, or therapies to treat neurotic behavior. By Katie LanginJun. 29, 2018 , 4:45 PMcenter_img Top stories: Chocolate money, the rise of multicellularity, and pet rabbit brainslast_img read more

Dhar MP Savitri Thakur of BJP

first_imgSavitri Thakur,  Dhar (ST Reserved), BJPWinning margin – 104,328 votes.2. She defeated her nearest Congress rival Umang Singhar. 3. Educational qualification – Higher Secondary, Marital Status – Married, Children – 2 sons.4.  Asset declared – Rs 9,206,464, criminal cases – noneSavitri was a social worker before joining politics. She was co-ordinator of the NGO Vashp for 9 years. Her husband is a farmer and her father, a retired employee of the state forest department.She didn’t have anyone in her family who was active in politics. However, her family has been associated with the RSS for a long time.The 16th Lok Sabha elections was the first big elections she fought. Earlier, she successfully won  Dhar Zila Panchayat president elections in 2006.She took a plunge in politics to empower poor, especially tribals. Her three priorities for constituency are Dhar-Jhabua rail line construction to join the two tribal-dominated districts, industrialisation and setting up of sugar mills.Savitri is expecting that Prime Minister Narendra Modi will provide strong leadership to the country and turn the country into a developed nation. She says that Modi’s wave, Chouhan’s beneficial schemes and hard labour put in by BJP and RSS cadres helped her to win elections.She says that the primary responsibility of Parliament was to make effective laws and make the country strong. She says that social media was an effective tool for communication but it has not yet penetrated in tribal-dominated areas – like her constituency. Savitri says she does doesn’t find time for books, films, music and sports. She says that she draws pleasure in meeting people and mitigating their problems.advertisementShe says that former Prime Minister Atal Bihari Vajpayee was ideal politician for her. He was a great leader, who linked rural India with roads.She adds that politics can be done without money power but political patronage does help sometimes. Savitri says you money can’t buy votes. “It is the people connect that help a politician to get votes and win elections,” she adds.  She says that there was no threat to the country as long as Modi is the Prime Minister.Her solution to1.    Curb inflation – Strong government check.2.    Tackle communal violence – Tough action against rioters and appeasement of none.  3.    Stop terror attacks – Stringent laws against terrorists.4.    Stop corruption – A powerful campaign against graft and strict punishment.  5.    Normalise relations to Pakistan and China – Effective foreign policy.6.    Stabilise rupee – Increase export, reduce import.7.    Raise employment – Industrialisation.8.    Reduce poverty – More poor friendly schemes.last_img read more

FA Cup final: Manchester City deep sixes Watford en route to completing domestic treble

first_imgAdvertisementManchester City asserted their dominance in English football by thrashing Watford 6-0 at the Wembley Stadium in London to clinch the FA Cup. Having already won the Premier League and the League Cup, Pep Guardiola’s side became the first men’s English club to complete the domestic treble.Manchester City captain Vincent Kompany clinches the FA Cup titleManchester City came all guns blazing in the match and Watford decided to pounce on the counter. The underdogs nearly scored with the strategy as Pereyra found himself in a one-on-one situation with City goalkeeper Ederson after getting on the end of a wonderful through ball from Deulofeu. But, Ederson came quick out of his line to avert the danger and keep the scoreline intact.Then on, it was all Manchester City and Watford fed off the scraps. David Silva broke the deadlock in the 27th minute after firing a low diagonal shot well past the goalkeeper. The scoreline read 2-0 in City’s favor at half time as Raheem Sterling toe-poked Gabriel Jesus’ goalbound shot in a selfish motive.Watford held their lines well in the second half but Kevin de Bruyne’s introduction in the midfield put an end to their plans. The Belgian scored the third of the night and his incisive passing carved open the Watford defense wide.Gabriel Jesus scored the fourth goal of the game before Raheem Sterling completed his hat-trick by netting two goals in six minutes.Manchester City move closer to securing a deal for Rodrigo Advertisementlast_img read more