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Officials move to crack down on fireworks

first_imgSANTA CLARITA – Fireworks are illegal in the Santa Clarita and Antelope valleys, except within the Palmdale city limits, where those marked “safe and sane” are allowed. That simple statement is something that officials from law enforcement and fire departments want to get across before any more injuries or fires are caused by someone wanting to blow something up to celebrate the Fourth of July. Arrests already have been made in Santa Clarita in an increased awareness and enforcement effort by deputies. Nathon Johnson, 18, of Canyon Country was arrested Wednesday morning on Soledad Canyon Road near Camp Plenty Road along with his 17-year-old driver, sheriff’s officials said. Both were charged with possession of an illegal explosive when three M-80s were found in the vehicle, according to a report. AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MORE11 theater productions to see in Southern California this week, Dec. 27-Jan. 2“Several calls have been received over the past few days reporting firecrackers and small explosions sounding like possible gunfire,” said sheriff’s Lt. Brenda Cambra of the Santa Clarita Valley station. Defining illegal fireworks is pretty simple, according to Jason Hurd, spokesman for the Los Angeles County Fire Department. “If it goes in the air, moves along the ground or explodes, it’s illegal,” he said. A statewide task force has also been established to stop the import of illegal fireworks from Nevada and Mexico. In 2005, 70 tons of illegal fireworks were confiscated in the Southern California region, many of it coming from Interstate 15 near Pahrump, Nev., according to the officials at the state Fire Marshal’s Office. “Over the last couple of years, we’ve seen an increase in illegal fireworks, including big skyrockets,” said sheriff’s Sgt. Gregg Lewison, who is heading a fireworks suppression task force from the Santa Clarita Valley sheriff’s station. “We want to make sure that the community is aware that these are dangerous and illegal, even the ones they call `safe and sane,’ within the city limits as well as the unincorporated areas of Castaic, Stevenson Ranch and Westridge. They may think because they bought it in Fillmore or Palmdale that it’s OK to have it, but it’s not. “People need to realize that there have been fires as a direct result of fireworks and the show for you and your 25 friends in the backyard may not be appreciated by the 200 people living around you. It stresses their pets and could catch a roof or tree on fire.” Part of the problem is that residents don’t take enforcement efforts seriously, which the task force aims to change. “An M-80 is the equivalent of a quarter-stick of dynamite. The bottom line is if you have one of those, the handcuffs are coming out,” he said. Nonprofit groups selling “safe and sane” fireworks in Palmdale experienced a tripling of permit fees – which jumped from $220 to $620 – by the City Council in January, specifically to offset costs of additional fire and sheriff’s patrols. In 2005, 70 people were cited in the Antelope Valley for illegal fireworks. Fire officials called it the most destructive Fourth of July in memory. According to Hurd, 46 fires were caused by fireworks in the Antelope Valley in 2005, consuming 1,100 acres of grass and brush and causing $20,000 in structural damage. In the same period in Santa Clarita, one fire could be directly related to fireworks; three acres of brush burned. In 2005, calls to Santa Clarita Valley fire stations doubled, up to 1,100 calls instead of the normal 500. Inspector John Mancha of the Los Angeles County Fire Department said that from 8 p.m. July 4 to 1 a.m. July 5, 570 calls were received, compared with the usual 100 to 200 calls. In both the Santa Clarita and Antelope valleys, Lewison said special teams of deputies will patrol strategically selected areas on the holiday, watching the skies and confiscating fireworks. In addition, Hurd said that there will be extra fire patrols and water tenders deployed in both the Santa Clarita and Antelope valleys, along with additional strike teams, comprised of five engines and battalion chief. “We want people to have fun, but we also have a responsibility to make it safer for everybody,” Lewison said. “Last year, the deputies answering the phones said it was out of control.” [email protected] (661) 257-5252160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img

NFL Players Attack Commissioner Goodells Authority In Grievances

NFL commissioner Roger GoodellThe NFL Players Association is not accepting commissioner Roger Goodell’s harsh suspensions in the New Orleans Saints bounty program case — or his seemingly all-encompassing power. Indeed, the union is fighting back.The Players Association filed a pair of grievances Thusday challenging Goodell’s authority to suspend four players for their involvement in Saint’s bounty system.In the first, filed with arbitrator Shyam Das, the NFLPA argues that Goodell is prohibited from punishing players for any conduct prior to August 4, when the current collective bargaining agreement took effect.“In connection with entering into the 2011 CBA, the NFL released all players from conduct engaged in prior to the execution of the CBA, on August 4, 2011,” the grievance says.The section of the CBA cited by the union is a covenant not to sue — an agreement in which the NFL and its teams pledged not to file lawsuits against the union and its members “with respect to conduct occurring prior to the execution of this Agreement.”But the league said that section of the CBA was not intended as an agreement to excuse player conduct that put player safety at risk, or conduct detrimental to the NFL.The NFLPA further argues that even if that argument fails, the appeal of the player suspensions should be heard by Ted Cottrell and Art Shell, the hearing officers for on-field conduct violations, rather than by Goodell as an off-field conduct issue.In the second grievance, the NFLPA argues that arbitrator Stephen Burbank, who serves as the “system arbitrator” for the league and its players’ union, has the authority to rule on the players’ conduct, rather than Goodell.According to the NFLPA grievance, the bounties, as non-disclosed payments to players, are a collective bargaining issue under the jurisdiction of the arbitrator and not Goodell. read more

Police get guns and drugs no arrests

first_img Related Items:#drugsandgunsoffstreets, #magneticmedianews, #noarrestfordrugsandgunsfound Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsAppBahamas, April 5, 2017 – Nassau – Unit officers were on an operation on Old Cedar Way, Yellow Elder Gardens, when they saw a man acting in a manner that aroused their suspicion.  When the officers approached the man, he fled on foot.  The area was searched and a black and silver pistol and marijuana were found.In the second incident, around 2:00pm on Monday April 3rd the Selective Enforcement Team was on an operation on Robinson Road when they searched an abandoned building and found an Austria pistol.A few hours later, shortly before 7:00pm, Selective Enforcement Team officers were on another operation on Market Street when they searched a premises and found a 9-millimeter pistol.  There were no arrests for any of the seizures.Story by: Sheri-kae McLeod#MagneticMediaNews#drugsandgunsoffstreets#noarrestfordrugsandgunsfoundlast_img read more

US Coast Guard offloads 11Tons of Cocaine seized in Eastern Pacific Ocean

first_imgU.S. Coast Guard offloads 11-Tons of Cocaine seized in Eastern Pacific Ocean KUSI Newsroom, Dan Plante, 00:00 00:00 spaceplay / pause qunload | stop ffullscreenshift + ←→slower / faster ↑↓volume mmute ←→seek  . seek to previous 12… 6 seek to 10%, 20% … 60% XColor SettingsAaAaAaAaTextBackgroundOpacity SettingsTextOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundSemi-TransparentOpaqueTransparentFont SettingsSize||TypeSerif MonospaceSerifSans Serif MonospaceSans SerifCasualCursiveSmallCapsResetSave SettingsSAN DIEGO (KUSI) – More than 11 tons of cocaine seized in international waters of the eastern Pacific Ocean from late August to mid-September will be offloaded in San Diego Wednesday by the Coast Guard Cutter Stratton.The drugs were seized from eight suspected smuggling vessels found off the coasts of Mexico, Central and South America by the Coast Guard cutters Stratton, Seneca and Active, according to a statement from the U.S. Coast Guard.“This offload reflects the outstanding efforts of the Coast Guard and our partner agencies to disrupt and dismantle transnational criminal organizations,” said Capt. Craig J. Wieschhorster, the Stratton’s skipper. “These interdiction results take hundreds of millions of dollars away from these criminal networks that work to undermine the rule of law in South and Central America which increases migration pressures on the U.S. southern border. Keeping this product off the streets of America saves lives, and I am very proud of the efforts of my crew.”The Stratton was responsible for stopping six vessels, while the Active and Seneca both stopped one vessel each.The official press release from the U.S. Coast Guard 11th District PA Detachment San Diego is pasted below:SAN DIEGO —The crew of the Coast Guard Cutter Stratton offloaded more than 11 tons of cocaine seized in international waters off the Eastern Pacific Ocean from late August to mid-September Wednesday in San Diego.The drugs were seized during the interdiction of eight suspected smuggling vessels found off the coasts of Mexico, Central and South America by the Coast Guard cutters Stratton (WMSL-752), Seneca (WMEC-906) and Active (WMEC-618).Stratton was responsible for six cases, seizing an estimated 16,473 pounds of cocaine.Seneca was responsible for one case, seizing an estimated 2,954 pounds of cocaine.Active was responsible for one case, seizing an estimated 2,646 pounds of cocaine.“This offload reflects the outstanding efforts of the Coast Guard and our partner agencies to disrupt and dismantle transnational criminal organizations,” said Capt. Craig J. Wieschhorster, Stratton’s commanding officer. “These interdiction results take hundreds of millions of dollars away from these criminal networks that work to undermine the rule of law in South and Central America, which increases migration pressures on the U.S. southern border. Keeping this product off the streets of America saves lives, and I am very proud of the efforts of my crew.”Numerous U.S. agencies from the Departments of Defense, Justice and Homeland Security cooperated in the effort to combat transnational organized crime. The Coast Guard, Navy, Customs and Border Protection, FBI, Drug Enforcement Administration and Immigration and Customs Enforcement along with allied and international partner agencies play a role in counter-drug operations. The fight against transnational criminal organizations in the Eastern Pacific requires unity of effort in all phases from detection, monitoring and interdictions, to criminal prosecutions by U.S. Attorneys in districts across the nation.The Coast Guard increased U.S. and allied presence in the Eastern Pacific Ocean and Caribbean Basin, which are known drug transit zones off of Central and South America, as part of its Western Hemisphere Strategy. During at-sea interdictions in international waters, a suspect vessel is initially detected and monitored by allied, military or law enforcement personnel coordinated by Joint Interagency Task Force-South based in Key West, Florida. The law enforcement phase of counter-smuggling operations in the Eastern Pacific is conducted under the authority of the 11th Coast Guard District, headquartered in Alameda. The interdictions, including the actual boardings, are led and conducted by members of the U.S. Coast Guard. The Stratton is a 418-foot national security cutter homeported in Alameda. The Seneca is a 270-foot medium-endurance cutter homeported in Boston, Massachusetts. The Active is a 210-foot medium-endurance cutter homeported in Port Angeles, Washington. Posted: October 3, 2018 Updated: 8:27 PM October 3, 2018 Categories: Good Morning San Diego, Local San Diego News FacebookTwitter KUSI Newsroom, Dan Plante 00:00 00:00 spaceplay / pause qunload | stop ffullscreenshift + ←→slower / faster ↑↓volume mmute ←→seek  . seek to previous 12… 6 seek to 10%, 20% … 60% XColor SettingsAaAaAaAaTextBackgroundOpacity SettingsTextOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundSemi-TransparentOpaqueTransparentFont SettingsSize||TypeSerif MonospaceSerifSans Serif MonospaceSans SerifCasualCursiveSmallCapsResetSave Settingslast_img read more

MTS updates policy to develop empty parking lots into affordable homes

first_img SAN DIEGO (KUSI) – San Diego’s Metropolitan Transit System Board of Directors unanimously agreed Thursday to change its joint development policy to redevelop empty and unused parking lots into affordable housing.Public transportation advocacy group Circulate San Diego recommended the change in an April report detailing how MTS has at least 57 acres of land and parking lots that could be repurposed into about 8,000 new housing units.San Diego City Councilwoman and MTS Board Chair Georgette Gomez did the most to help guide the policy change into becoming reality, Circulate San Diego representatives said.“We applaud Chair Gomez for championing this major victory,” said Circulate San Diego Executive Director Colin Parent. “The new policy incorporates our recommendations and will help the region alleviate the current housing crisis.”Representatives from local housing advocacy groups Housing You Matters and the San Diego Housing Federation joined Parent and Circulate San Diego in asking the MTS Board to accept the recommendations.The press release announcing the decision from Circulate SD is below: Today’s vote is a response to the release of a report in April by Circulate San Diego titled “Real Opportunity.” Circulate’s report provides detailed recommendations for how MTS can stimulate the creation of as many as 8,000 new homes adjacent to transit stations. The report also includes new research demonstrating that a large number of parking lots owned by MTS are substantially under-utilized.“We applaud Chair Gómez for championing this major victory. The new policy incorporates our recommendations and will help the region alleviate the current housing crisis,” said Colin Parent, Executive Director and General Counsel for Circulate San Diego. Parent also authored the report “Real Opportunity.”Circulate San Diego was joined at the MTS Board meeting by affordable housing advocates to support the agency adopting updates to its joint development policy to allow their under-utilized parking lots.The following advocates were among those that joined Circulate San Diego in calling on MTS to amend their joint development policy so that more homes can be built near transit:Colin Parent, Circulate San DiegoMary Lydon, Housing You MattersStephen Russell, San Diego Housing FederationAndrew Malick, Malick Infill DevelopmentGabe Gutierrez, Circulate San DiegoPictures from the event are attached to this release.About Circulate San DiegoCirculate San Diego is a regional non-profit organization dedicated to advancing mobility and making the region a better place to move, work, learn, and play. Our work focuses on creating great mobility choices, more walkable and bikeable neighborhoods, and land uses that promote sustainable growth. For more information, go to www.circulatesd.org. KUSI Newsroom, KUSI Newsroom October 11, 2018 Updated: 3:04 PMcenter_img Posted: October 11, 2018 MTS updates policy to develop empty parking lots into affordable homes Categories: Local San Diego News FacebookTwitterlast_img read more